31 October 2013

"Never underestimate the insights encoded into the coefficients of a polynomial!"

—Steven Rudich

In this post I’m going to write a toy library for manipulating infinite lazy polynomials. I promise this will be fun.

Representation

You might try representing a polynomial of infinite degree as an infinite stream of coefficients. But I think it would be easier to think about it in terms of a function that gives you the coefficient for a given power of in the polynomial. So the polynomial represented by some function would be

Here’s the setup:

class Poly(coeffs: Int => Double) {

  // Memoizing coefficient accessor. Returns the coefficient for x^n.
  def apply(n: Int): Double = memo.getOrElseUpdate(n, this.coeffs(n))

  // The memo table
  private val memo = scala.collection.mutable.HashMap[Int, Double]()

  override def toString = {
    "{ %s, ... }".format((0 to 10).map(i => df.format(this(i))).mkString(", "))
  }
  private val df = new java.text.DecimalFormat("#.#######")
}

The Poly class just wraps a function of type Int => Double, memoizes it, and provides a toString representation including the first so many coefficients.

Now we can create instances like this:

scala> val one = new Poly(n => if (n == 0) 1 else 0)
one: Poly = { 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, ... }

scala> val x = new Poly(n => if (n == 1) 1 else 0)
x: Poly = { 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, ... }

You can access arbitrary coefficients by calling the apply method.

scala> x(0)
res0: Double = 0.0

scala> x(1)
res1: Double = 1.0

scala> x(12)
res2: Double = 0.0

Just keep in mind that p(n) is the coefficient of in p, not (i.e., evaluated at ) as you might expect to see. I can get away with this because I’m probably never going to evaluate these polynomials, I’m just going to treat them formally, as mathematical objects in their own right. (To get my terminology straight, as some commenters have pointed out, these objects are called formal power series.)

Simple operations

Polys aren’t that useful until we can do arithmetic to them. Let’s add support for addition, subtraction and negation:

class Poly(coeffs: Int => Double) {
  // ...

  def +(that: Poly): Poly = new Poly(n => this(n) + that(n))

  def -(that: Poly): Poly = new Poly(n => this(n) - that(n))

  def unary_-(): Poly = new Poly(n => -this(n))
}

It just goes elementwise. Multiplication and division by a constant are also easy:

class Poly(coeffs: Int => Double) {
  // ...

  def *(x: Double): Poly = new Poly(n => this(n) * x)

  def /(x: Double): Poly = new Poly(n => this(n) / x)
}

Multiplication of polynomials is the first interesting case. How do you multiply two infinite polynomials? Well, let’s just consider the coefficient of . It’s going to be the sum of the products of the coefficents of all pairs of powers that add up to . In math:

where is the coefficient of in .

In code:

class Poly(coeffs: Int => Double) {
  // ...

  def *(that: Poly): Poly = new Poly(n =>
    (0 to n).map(i => this(i) * that(n-i)).sum
  )
}

It’s pretty nice to only have to think about the coefficient of one power of at a time!

Let’s try it out:

scala> one + x
res0: Poly = { 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, ... }

scala> one + x*x*3
res1: Poly = { 1, 0, 3, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, ... }

scala> (x + one*4) * (x - one*3)
res2: Poly = { -12, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, ... }

I’m going to get tired of typing one*4 every time I mean 4, so before I go any further I’m going to add some implicit conversions from Int and Double to Poly:

implicit def intToPoly(i: Int): Poly = one * i
implicit def doubleToPoly(d: Double): Poly = one * d

The compiler will insert these methods any time they would help get the expression to typecheck. So now I can do

scala> (1 + 2*x + x*x) * (3 - x)
res0: Poly = { 3, 5, 1, -1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, ... }

scala> (x + 7) * (x - 7)
res1: Poly = { -49, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, ... }

That’s much nicer.

I’m also going to throw in exponentiation as repeated multiplication.

class Poly(coeffs: Int => Double) {
  // ...

  private val powMemo = scala.collection.mutable.HashMap[Int, Poly]()

  def **(p: Int): Poly = {
    powMemo.getOrElseUpdate(p, {
      if (p == 0) 1
      else {
        val p2 = this ** (p / 2)
        if (p % 2 == 0) p2 * p2 else p2 * p2 * this
      }
    })
  }
}

I memoized it because I love memoizing things, but also because I’m going to need it in the next section.

Division

Division is a little tricky. I don’t want quotient and remainder, I want “real” division. This might sound impossible, but luckily our polynomials are allowed to be infinitely long.

Here’s how it’s going to work. I’m going to use the identity

This should apply just as well to a polynomial :

So we’ve reduced division to addition and multiplication, but now we have an infinite sum. How are we going to compute the coefficient of in that sum if any term in the sum can contribute to it? Well maybe we can arrange it so that for a given coefficient, we only need to look at a finite number of terms.

For example, if has no constant term, then the coefficients of through in will be 0. This is easy to see: if the lowest power of in is , then the lowest power of in will be no less than . So in order to figure out the coefficient of in the above infinite sum, we only need to consider contributions from through , because the contributions from higher powers of will be 0.

OK, so now if we want to find for some polynomial , all we have to do is contrive a whose constant term is 0. So just let

where is the constant term of . Then we’ll have

all of which we know how to compute. Here’s the code:

class Poly(coeffs: Int => Double) {
  // ...

  def /(that: Poly): Poly = this * that.inv

  def inv: Poly = {
    val a = this(0)
    val q = 1 - this / a
    new Poly(n => (0 to n).map(i => (q ** i)(n)).sum / a)
  }
}

Let’s try it:

scala> (6 + 5*x + x**2) / (x + 2)
res0: Poly = { 3, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, ... }

Nice! How about something that doesn’t divide evenly:

scala> val p = (1 + 2*x - x**2) / (5 + x)
p: Poly = { 0.2, 0.36, -0.272, 0.0544, -0.01088, 0.002176, -0.0004352, 0.000087, -0.0000174, 0.0000035, -0.0000007, ... }

scala> p * (5 + x)
res1: Poly = { 1, 2, -1, 0, -0, 0, -0, 0, 0, 0, -0, ... }

Cool. It looks like there are some floating-point rounding artifacts, but fundamentally it looks like it works.

One more, for fun:

scala> 1 / (1 - x)
res2: Poly = { 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, ... }

Looks good!

It’s worth noting that those rounding artifacts are due to my use of Double to store and manipulate the numbers that make up the polynomial. It’s not because the formulas I’m using are inexact, or because they only approximate the “true” answer. The formulas are exact. If I were using an arbitrary precision number class instead of Double, the numbers would come out as close to correct as I wanted.

Fractional powers

I also want to be able to compute where is not a whole number. Sounds impossible, but once again there is an algebraic identity we can use:

which should apply equally well to polynomials. Once again we have an infinite sum, and so again we’ll have to contrive a that has no constant term. This time, we can let

where is the constant term of . And so we’ll have

Here’s the code:

class Poly(coeffs: Int => Double) {
  // ...

  def **(r: Double): Poly = {
    val a = this(0)
    val ar = math.pow(a, r)
    val q = this / a - 1
    def coeff(n: Int) = (0 to n-1).map(i => r - i).product / (1 to n).product
    new Poly(n => (0 to n).map(i => coeff(i) * (q ** i)(n)).sum * ar)
  }
}

OK, let’s see if this actually works…

scala> val p = (4 + x)**2
p: Poly = { 16, 8, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, ... }

scala> p ** 0.5
res0: Poly = { 4, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, ... }

Alright! Let’s try it on a polynomial that is not a perfect square:

scala> val p = (5 + 2*x + x**3) ** 0.5
p: Poly = { 2.236068, 0.4472136, -0.0447214, 0.2325511, -0.0469574, 0.0140425, -0.0158403, 0.0083325, -0.0039368, 0.0028963, -0.0019013, ... }

scala> p * p
res1: Poly = { 5, 2, -0, 1, -0, -0, 0, 0, 0, 0, -0, ... }

Spooky.

Who knew you could take the 5th root of any polynomial you wanted?

scala> val p = (2 - 3*x + x**3 + x**7) ** 0.2
p: Poly = { 1.1486984, -0.3446095, -0.2067657, -0.0712193, -0.0575498, -0.0366596, -0.0297476, 0.0918742, 0.1186057, 0.1700039, 0.200703, ... }

scala> p ** 5
res1: Poly = { 2, -3, -0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, -0, -0, -0, ... }

WTFFFFF.

Log and exp

I’m going to push forward at the risk of going insane. Let’s look at . The identity to use here is

This will work for our purposes for a polynomial provided once again that does not have a constant term. This is easily enough done — if we want to find , we just let , where is the constant term of . Then,

In code:

class Poly(coeffs: Int => Double) {
  // ...

  def exp: Poly = {
    val a = this(0)
    val q = this - a
    val ea = math.exp(a)
    def fact(n: Int) = (1 to n).product
    new Poly(n => (0 to n).map(i => (q ** i)(n) / fact(i)).sum * ea)
  }
}

For logarithms, the identity we’ll exploit is the Mercator series:

To find , we’ll let

where is the constant term of . Then,

Here’s the code:

class Poly(coeffs: Int => Double) {
  // ...

  def log: Poly = {
    val a = this(0)
    val logA = math.log(a)
    val q = this / a - 1
    def alternatingHarmonic(n: Int) = if (n % 2 == 0) -1.0 / n else 1.0 / n
    logA + new Poly(n => (1 to n).map(i => alternatingHarmonic(i) * (q ** i)(n)).sum)
  }
}

Let’s just check the identities and that exp and log are inverses of each other:

scala> x.exp
res0: Poly = { 1, 1, 0.5, 0.1666667, 0.0416667, 0.0083333, 0.0013889, 0.0001984, 0.0000248, 0.0000028, 0.0000003, ... }

scala> (1 + x).log
res1: Poly = { 0, 1, -0.5, 0.3333333, -0.25, 0.2, -0.1666667, 0.1428571, -0.125, 0.1111111, -0.1, ... }

scala> (1 - 2*x + x**3).exp
res2: Poly = { 2.7182818, -5.4365637, 5.4365637, -0.9060939, -3.6243758, 4.7116885, -2.0236098, -0.9751297, 2.0106656, -1.1213512, -0.0682687, ... }

scala> (1 - 2*x + x**3).exp.log
res3: Poly = { 1, -2, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, -0, ... }

scala> (1 - 2*x + x**3).log
res4: Poly = { 0, -2, -2, -1.6666667, -2, -2.4, -3.1666667, -4.2857143, -6, -8.5555556, -12.4, ... }

scala> (1 - 2*x + x**3).log.exp
res5: Poly = { 1, -2, 0, 1, -0, -0, 0, -0, 0, 0, -0, ... }

Awesome.

Fun with polynomials

You can use polynomials to produce binomial coefficients:

scala> (1 + x)**4
res0: Poly = { 1, 4, 6, 4, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, ... }

scala> (1 + x)**7
res1: Poly = { 1, 7, 21, 35, 35, 21, 7, 1, 0, 0, 0, ... }

There’s also a trick for “differentiating” a sequence — I use that term very loosely. All I mean is producing a polynomial where the coefficients are the differences between successive coefficients in some other polynomial. You do this by multiplying by . For example:

scala> (1 + 2*x + 7*x*x) * (1 - x)
res2: Poly = { 1, 1, 5, -7, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, ... }

scala> (1 + x)**7 * (1 - x)
res3: Poly = { 1, 6, 14, 14, 0, -14, -14, -6, -1, 0, 0, ... }

This makes sense because . So you’re literally subtracting one coefficient from the next.

Well, if that works, it stands to reason that dividing by should “integrate” a sequence — that is, keep a running sum of the coefficients. Lo and behold:

scala> (1 + 3*x - 5*(x**3)) / (1 - x)
res4: Poly = { 1, 4, 4, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, ... }

scala> (1 + x)**7 / (1 - x)
res5: Poly = { 1, 8, 29, 64, 99, 120, 127, 128, 128, 128, 128, ... }

scala> 1 / ((1 - x)**2)
res6: Poly = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, ... }

The second example there demonstrates the fact that the sum of binomial coefficients is a power of 2. We can also demonstrate that the sum of the “even” and “odd” binomial coefficients are equal:

scala> (1 - x)**7
res7: Poly = { 1, -7, 21, -35, 35, -21, 7, -1, 0, 0, 0, ... }

scala> (1 - x)**7 / (1 - x)
res8: Poly = { 1, -6, 15, -20, 15, -6, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, ... }

since the running sum ends up at 0.

Here’s a polynomial with alternating signs:

scala> 1 / (1 + x)
res9: Poly = { 1, -1, 1, -1, 1, -1, 1, -1, 1, -1, 1, ... }

Now “integrate” it twice…

scala> 1 / (1 + x) / (1 - x)
res10: Poly = { 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, ... }

scala> 1 / (1 + x) / ((1 - x)**2)
res11: Poly = { 1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4, 4, 5, 5, 6, ... }

What a weird polynomial! This is pretty fun to play around with.

Generating functions

This brings us to the world of generating functions. Generating functions are awesome. The basic idea is that if you have an infinite sequence of numbers, you first create a polynomial with those numbers as coefficients. Then you find a simple “closed-form” function whose Taylor series expansion is that polynomial.

A simple example is the sequence , that is, the sequence of all 1s. This corresponds to the polynomial

You would say that is the generating function for the sequence . (Here the value of and the radius of convergence of the functions are irrelevant; these formulas are to be interpreted symbolically, not numerically.)

The generating function for the sequence can be derived as follows:

You can even find the generating function for the Fibonacci sequence. It turns out to be

There are all sorts of algebraic tricks to figure out what the generating function is for a sequence, given either a recurrence relation or a formula for each term of the sequence.

If you’re curious about it, you should head on over to Generatingfunctionology. The intro and first chapter give you a good sense for the power of this technique, from counting to statistical analysis to proving certain identities.

After you’ve found a generating function for your sequence, you can use Poly to check your work. Let’s try it:

scala> x / ((1 - x)**2)
res0: Poly = { 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, ... }

scala> x / (1 - x - x**2)
res1: Poly = { 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, ... }

scala> x * (x + 1) / ((1 - x)**3)
res2: Poly = { 0, 1, 4, 9, 16, 25, 36, 49, 64, 81, 100, ... }

Automatic differentiation

Poly is essentially a trick to produce the Taylor series of a function automatically. Recall that the Taylor series of a function around a point is:

That means if you want to find the derivatives of a function at a point, you can write the function as a Poly => Poly, evaluate it at c + x, and read the derivatives right off the coefficients.

def derivatives(f: Poly => Poly, c: Double): Stream[Double] = {
  def fact(n: Int) = (1 to n).product
  val fc = f(c + x)
  Stream.from(1).map(i => fc(i) * fact(i))
}

For example, here are the first 20 derivatives of at 1:

scala> derivatives(x => (x + 1).log ** 2, 1).take(20).toList
res0: List[Double] = List(0.6931471805599453, 0.15342640972002733, -0.4034264097200274, 0.8551396145800411, -2.085279229160082, 5.963198072900205, -19.76459421870062, 74.80107976545214, -318.89181906180863, 1513.7631857781387, -7923.190928890694, 45349.42510889882, -87446.88299088406, 27733.67519683439, -20865.303964105937, 10034.86743176731, 696.0046429573814, -1045.8464120718293, -61.68000765454794, -572.2744267431246)

Double checking, say, the 12th derivative (45349.42510889882) against Wolfram Alpha:

scala> def d12(x: Double) = -2880 * (27720 * math.log(x+1) - 83711) / math.pow(x+1, 12)
d12: (x: Double)Double

scala> d12(1)
res0: Double = 45349.42510889882

OK!

If you read my last post on exact numeric nth derivatives, you might have noticed that the code for Poly is pretty similar to the implementation of dual numbers that I presented in that post. Really the only difference is the lack of reference to the rank of the matrix. The matrices were already lazy and already only contained information, so it was a short step to turn them into lazy infinite polynomials.

Conclusion

Some things to think about:

  1. Is there a generating function for the sequence ? Or a way to construct a new sequence from an existing sequence such that , at the generating function level? I guess what I’m getting at is, is there a way to get the coefficients of some polynomial to be the derivatives of some function, without having to multiply each one by ? Kinda silly, but it would be neat.

  2. Right now dividing by or any polynomial with no constant term results NaNs everywhere. I see why it’s happening… the first term of the Taylor series for is , so (a.k.a. f(0)) will always equal . But it should work at least some of the time, for instance when you can factor out a power of from both the numerator and the denominator and cancel. So should reduce to . That should be easy to implement.

  3. I should really use Kahan summation to reduce floating point error (h/t to my friend Matt Adereth for the idea).

  4. Complex-valued polynomials would let me implement sin and cos in terms of exp. I should genericize the implementation of Poly to work with any numeric type. Might be fun to use spire’s numeric tower for that.

  5. While I’m at it I should make Poly an instace of spire’s Ring typeclass. Infinite polynomials are a ring but not a field because some non-zero elements lack a multiplicative inverse, for instance, . For any p: Poly, p / p will evaluate to 1 (provided I’ve implemented cancellation), but 1 / p doesn’t always exist as its own Poly, and that’s what I’d need for it to qualify as a field.

BTW, I’m pretty sure this article doesn’t contain any new code, and it almost certainly contains no new math. I tried to supply references where I could find them, but please send me links to relevant articles I may have missed!

All the code in this post is available in this gist.



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